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This was my third visit to Singapore, so it felt like the perfect time to dig a little deeper into the local culture and the day to day life. It all started with a simple lunch at the Maxwell Food Centre. Conveniently located just a short walk away from Chinatown, it seemed like a perfect place to grab a bite to eat and rest my feet after a long day of walking around.

I had no idea what awaited for me inside.

Maxwell Food Centre. Hawker Centre. Singapore

Maxwell Food Centre, an inconspicuous looking building where my hawker food adventure began

Rows upon rows of food stalls, tantalising smells, and the clinking sounds of woks and wooden spoons greeted me as I stepped foot into what I later learned was one of the best hawker centres in Singapore.

Overwhelmed by choice, I roamed wide eyed through the rows of stalls within the centre. Mutton, crab, chicken, duck, oysters, soups in all colours and flavours, and of course bean curd and sugar cane juice, the locals favourite.

Remembering a Wikitravel article I read on the way over, I gravitated towards the Fish Head Soup, a Singapore specialty. I had to have it. And it was amazing! From that moment onwards I was hooked, I wanted nothing more than to continue trying hawker foods in Singapore and I was determined to make it my focus for the trip.

3 days and 5 Singapore’s best food courts later here is a list of my absolute favourites!

Fish Head Bee Hoon

A seafood soup with a slightly sweet and flavourful milk based broth with greens, rice noodles, and fish. If having a fish head sticking out of your soup bothers you, try the sliced fish variety instead. It’s just as delicious and eliminates the work required to get the fish off its bones.

For just $5/bowl, this was the dish that got me hooked!

Sliced Fish Bee Hoon. Maxwell Road Food Centre in Stall 77. Singapore

Sliced Fish Bee Hoon. Maxwell Road Food Centre in Stall 77. Singapore

Find it at the Maxwell Road Food Centre in Stall 77

Soya Sauce Chicken

The stall selling this dish looked just like 10 other stalls selling chicken dishes inside the Chinatown Food Complex, but it was the long line of people curving all around the corner that made me try this rather simple, but incredibly delicious meal. 15 min wait was absolutely worth it! The chicken, which cost me just $2.50 was tender and juicy. I wanted to suck it dry instead of chewing it and the blend of chicken juices mixed with the soya sauce that coated the noodles is still making me salivate now.

Soya Sauce Chicken. Chinatown Food Centre, Singapore

Soya Sauce Chicken. Chinatown Food Centre, Singapore

Chicken Fried Rice

It staple in any Asian cuisine, it’s a dish without any surprises. Chopped chicken is wok fried with rice, spices, and sauces. Simple to make, but as you would expect, it tasted phenomenal.

Chicken Fried Rice at the Old Airport Road Food Centre. Singapore

Chicken Fried Rice at the Old Airport Road Food Centre. Singapore

Chicken Rice (not the fried variety) is also a great choice for those looking to try something simple. It’s a Singapore favourite. If you want the best of the best, head to Tian Tian Hainanese Chicken Rice stall (#01-10 at the Maxwell Food Centre) which serves the best chicken rice in Singapore.

Chwee Kueh

Chwee kueh is not a dish you’d typically pick from the menu at the hawker centres, but it’s one you absolutely shouldn’t miss. Chwee kueh is a steamed rice cake garnished with oil and some pickled relish on top. The savoury taste of the relish perfectly compliments the jelly like texture of the rice cake, making it a great snack! For $2/5 pieces you simply can’t miss it!

Chwee Kueh from the Jian Bo Shui Kueh stall #2-05 in the Tiong Bahru Market Hawker Centre

Chwee Kueh from the Jian Bo Shui Kueh stall #2-05 in the Tiong Bahru Market Hawker Centre

For the best Chwee Kueh in Singapore head to Jian Bo Shui Kueh stall #2-05 in the Tiong Bahru Market Hawker Centre.

Kampong Carrot Cake

It’s not a cake and it doesn’t even taste like carrots, yet this dish has earned the Kampong Carrot Cake stall (#02-26) in Tiong Bahru Market Hawker Centre a spot on the list of Top 5 Hawker Stalls in all of Singapore.

Kampong Carrot Cake from stall (#02-26) in Tiong Bahru Market Hawker Centre. Best Singapore hawker food

Kampong Carrot Cake from stall (#02-26) in Tiong Bahru Market Hawker Centre

The carrot cake itself reminded me more of Pad Thai than any carrot dish I’ve ever had. The cake is made out of radish cake and coated in a carrot sauce mixed with egg and vegetables. It is probably my favourite hawker dish in Singapore!

Moving onto desserts…

Soybean Curd

If you have ever had soybean ice cream at a sushi restaurant then you’ll find the taste of soybean curd somewhat familiar. Its jello like texture sits in a sweet milky base and is a favourite with the locals.

 Lao Ban Soya Beancurd #01-125 Stall at the Old Airport Road Food Centre

Lao Ban Soya Beancurd #01-125 Stall at the Old Airport Road Food Centre

The spot to try it is at the Lao Ban Soya Beancurd #01-125 Stall at the Old Airport Road Food Centre in East Singapore.

7. Ice Kachang or Ais Kachang

Ice Kachang (meaning ice beans) is technically a Malaysian dessert, but is probably one of Singapore’s most ubiquitous desserts. It is probably the closest thing to a healthy ice cream that you’ll find here in Singapore. It’s consists of shaved ice flavoured with fruit syrup, topped with fruit jellies, milk, and bits of fruits on top. The treat is cold and refreshing, and so much better for you than ice cream, yet feels equally delicious!

Offered in many coffee shops, hawker centres, and food courts around Singapore, it’s an easy one to find. I recommend the Cold Desserts stall at the Lau Pa Sat Festival Market purely for their amazing selection of flavours and Ice Kachang varieties.

Ice Kachang at the Lau Pa Sat Festival Market. Best Singapore hawker food

Ice Kachang at the Lau Pa Sat Festival Market

One of the biggest issues I came across when eating my way through Singapore’s Hawker Centres is that could not handle all the food I wanted to try! There was only so much I could eat in my short 3 days in the city.

If you have more time in Singapore, here are a few other local favourites that are worth a try.

  • Fried Kway Teow – “stir-fried ricecake strips” is a national favourite in Malaysia and Singapore. Made from flat rice noodles stir-fried soy sauce, chilli, shrimp paste, prawns, bean sprouts and chives.
  • Bak Kut Teh – meat bone tea usually eaten with rice or noodles. Despite its name, there is in fact no tea in the dish itself.
  • Satay – a dish of seasoned, skewered and grilled meat, served with a sauce
  • Laksa –  popular spicy noodle soup that consists of rice noodles or rice vermicelli with chicken, prawn or fish, served in spicy soup.
  • Chilli Crab –  mud crab stir-fried in a semi-thick, sweet and savoury tomato and chilli based sauce. Despite the name, the dish is not very spicy.

 

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7 Hawker Dishes You Have to Try in Singapore

What other Singapore favourites would you add to the list?