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Visiting South Australia was never high on my priority list.  I didn’t know much about this region, so I didn’t feel like I was missing out. But I was! South Australia is a vibrant and culturally rich part of Australia with a lot to explore. So when our friends invited Max and I to join them for a weekend in South Australia’s famous wine region – Barossa Valley, we were eager to finally check out this part of Australia.

Our trip to Barossa Valley was so much more than I expected! If you love wine, good food, and stunning views, then Barossa is for you!

Here is what we discovered on our trip and what you need to know to plan your getaway to Barossa.

Where is Barossa Valley Located?

Barossa Valley is located in South Australia, about 70kms north of Adelaide. It only takes an hour to get to Barossa by car, and about 1.5hrs if you are hopping on public transport. Barossa spans the area of about 900 square km and connects the towns of NuriootpaTanunda, and Angaston. 

How Much Should You Budget?

Let me dispel the myth: spending a few days in Barossa doesn’t have to break the bank. Thumbs up for backpackers and travelers on a tight budget. You can spend a few days on just over $75 a day. On the low end, your cost break down will look like this:

Transportation from Adelaide to Barossa Valley – public transport ( $13/each way)
Getting around – bike hire at Barossa Valley Backpackers ($20/day)
Accommodation –  Dorm room in Barossa Valley Backpackers ($27/night)
Food – local cafes and groceries ($30/day)
Wine tasting – $0
Total Backpacker Budget (3 days/2 nights)= $230, ($76 per day)

Barossa Valley Backpackers, South Australia

Barossa Valley Backpackers, South Australia

If you’ve got a bit more room in your budget, Barossa Valley is a place worth the splurge. Your relaxed budget might look like this:

Transportation – $100
Hire a car. It will cost you just a bit more, but will allow you to easily get to Barossa and get around the region. You can visit whatever wineries you want, stay for as long as you want, and not have to rely on a scheduled tour with a preset itinerary.

Accommodation – $50-$75/night
There are dozens of hotel and B&B options in Barossa Valley. There is no reason to pay a premium to stay in the town centre.  The majority of the wineries, scattered across 3 main towns: NuriootpaTanunda, and Angaston, are all within a short 10-15 min drive from each other.

Food – $20-$30/meal
Most of the wineries offer a small food menu, ranging from cheese platters, to little sandwiches and other snacks. They are great spots for lunch or early dinner. If you are looking for some food outside the wineries, check out Nosh or Pod Cafe – both come with a descent lunch menu, offering local, and sometimes even organic options.

Lunch at Maggie Beers Farm, Barossa Valley, South Australia

Lunch at Maggie Beers Farm, Barossa Valley, South Australia

Lunch at Nosh, Barossa Valley, South Australua

Lunch at Nosh, Barossa Valley, South Australia

Amazing cheese platter at the Artisans of Barossa Winery, Barossa Valley, South Australia

Amazing cheese platter at the Artisans of Barossa Winery, Barossa Valley, South Australia

Wine Tasting – $100+
While the tasting itself doesn’t cost anything, you will undoubtably fall in love with some new varieties and brands of wine, that you’ll want to bring back home. Prices range dramatically, from bottles as cheap as $9, to $1500, and more. Stock up where it makes sense. Most wineries are happy to ship your purchases to your home in Australia or overseas. Keep in mind that a lot of these brands are also widely distributed throughout Australia and can be purchased for the same price at your local Dan Murphy’s. 

Penfolds Wine, Barossa Valley, South Australia

Penfolds Wine, Barossa Valley, South Australia

Wine tasting at Artisans of Barossa, Barossa Valley, South Australia

Artisans of Barossa, Barossa Valley, South Australia

Wine tasting at Wolf Blass Winery, Barossa Valley, South Australia

Wolf Blass Winery, Barossa Valley, South Australia

Wolf Blass Winery, Barossa Valley, South Australia

Wolf Blass Winery, Barossa Valley, South Australia

Total “Splurge” Budget (3 days/2 nights) = $400-$500

Where to Stay in Barossa Valley?

As mentioned above, there are lots of accommodation options in Barossa Valley. But before you start searching for the best deal on Agoda, check out Light Pass House B&B.  We really loved our stay at this beautiful Bed & Breakfast. Built in 1920s by an immigrant German family, this house retained a lot of the character, giving it a unique vintage feel. This 2 bedroom home, that can comfortably sleep up to 5-6 people, has a lovely garden, a cozy living room, a spotless bathroom, along with a laundry room, and a fully stocked kitchen!  It had everything we needed for a perfect weekend in Barossa Valley. It was a charming place to come home to in the evening. We loved curling up in front of the fire place with a glass of wine, after a long day of cruising around the wineries and checking out the towns.

Light Pass House B&B, Barossa Valley, South Australia

Light Pass House B&B, Barossa Valley, South Australia

Main bedroom in the Light Pass House, Barossa Valley

Main bedroom in the Light Pass House, Barossa Valley

Living room at the Light Pass House B&B, Barossa Valley, South Australia

Living room at the Light Pass House B&B, Barossa Valley, South Australia

Kitchen in the Light Pass House, Barossa Valley, South Australia

Kitchen in the Light Pass House, Barossa Valley, South Australia

Light Pass House was a perfect place for our stay in Barossa Valley. For your stay in Barossa Valley, click here.

*Our stay at the Light Pass House was partially subsidised, but opinions are, as always, our own. 

What To Do in Barossa Valley?

1. Visit the Wineries

Wine has been a part of the culture and every day life in Barossa Valley since 1842. You may have heard that Barossa Valley is famous for its wine, but what you might not know, is that this regions is home to over 70 different wineries. A tasting at each winery will take anywhere between 30min-1hr.  Most wineries are opened for only 5-6 hours a day (from 10am-5pm), so you would need 10 full days of wine tasting to explore them all. UNBELIEVABLE! Although, according to the Barossa Valley Information Centre, an average Barossa Valley visitors stays for only 1-2 days and visits only 5- 10 wineries.

Barossa Valley, South Australia

Barossa Valley, South Australia

My advice, don’t try to plan your wine tasting route ahead of time. Start at the Barossa Valley Information Centre in Tanunda, they will happily advise you a few good starting options. Alternatively, pick a winery that you are familiar with and start there. Tell the staff what you liked and didn’t like about the wines you tried and they will, without a doubt, recommend a few others wineries for you to add to your day’s itinerary. That’s the spirit of Barossa, a region where the wine makers promote the love for wine rather than their own brands.

My favourite wineries were:

Yellow Label Moscato, Wolf Blass Winery

Wolf Blass Winery – for knowledgable staff and their delicious Moscato

Yalumba Winery, Barossa Valley

Yalumba Winery – for their charming gardens and an intimate tasting room

Driving down Barossa Valley Way

Seppeltsfield Winery – for the beautiful drive leading up to the cellar door

View from Artisans of Barossa Winery, Barossa Valley

Artisans of Barossa Winery – for the best cheese platter and the best sunset of the weekend

Artisans of Barossa, Barossa Valley, South Australia

Artisans of Barossa, Barossa Valley, South Australia

2. Have lunch at Maggie Beer’s Farm

Maggie Beer is a household name in Australia. She’s a cook, a food author, a restaurant owner, and a member of the Order of Australia, for the promotion of Australian produce and cuisine.  Her farm in Barossa Valley is a place to see where it all began. There are decades of history on the walls and inviting smells in the Farm Shop. Here you can wonder around and try just about every product made by Maggie Beer.

Peacock at the Maggie Beer Farm, Barossa Valley

Peacock at the Maggie Beer Farm

Cider at Maggie Beer's Farm Shop, Barossa Valley

Cider at Maggie Beer’s Farm Shop

Pate at Maggie Beer's Farm Shop, Barossa Valley

Pate collection at Maggie Beer’s Farm Shop

Sauce collection at Maggi Beer's Farm Shop, Barossa Valley

Sauce collection at Maggie Beer’s Farm Shop

Once you’ve found your favourite food, grab one of Maggie’s picnic fares and enjoy your lunch on the patio.

Picnic Fare at Maggie Beer's Farm Shop, Barossa Valley

Picnic Fare at Maggie Beer’s Farm Shop

At 2pm daily, you can join a cooking class demonstration to learn how to incorporate some of Maggie’s delicious ingredients in your own recipes.

3. Cruise down the Seppeltsfield Road

Seppeltsfield Road is a road lined with hundreds of palm trees, leading to the Seppeltsfield winery. This 10 km stretch is one of the most beautiful parts of Barossa. Stop along the road to appreciate and admire the views around you.

Seppeltsfields Road, Barossa Valley

Seppeltsfield Road, Barossa Valley

If you are lucky, you might even run into a few new friends along the way!

Llama in Barossa Valley

Llama in Barossa Valley

Up close and personal with a llama in Barossa Valley

Up close and personal with a llama in Barossa Valley

Sheep in Barossa Valley

Sheep in Barossa Valley

4. Relax, unwind and take in the beauty of the region.

You’ll be surrounded by lush vineyards sprawling under the bright rays of sun and clear blue skies. Slow down.. appreciate the views, take some photos to remember your trip to the Barossa Valley.

Vineard in Barossa Valley

Barossa Valley

View from the Barossa Sculpture Park, Tanunda

Vineyard, Barossa Valley

As always, if you have a comment or a question about traveling to Barossa Valley, I’d love to hear from you!

Planning a big trip to Australia? Check out other posts about Australia and visit AUSTRALIA TRAVEL GUIDE to learn more about planning your trip to the Land Down Under.

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If you love wine, good food, and stunning views, then Barossa Valley is for you! Here is what you need to know to plan your getaway to the Barossa Valley.

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