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Disclaimer: This post was brought to you in partnership with Tasmanian Safaris, Tasmanian Eco Tours that take you beyond the scenery.

If you are planning a trip to Tasmania, you are already well ahead of the travel crowds. Despite being known as one of the most beautiful states in Australia, Tasmania is still one of the least explored regions, struggling to keep up with the likes of Sydney, Melbourne and the Great Barrier Reef.

But the truth is, Tasmania has just as much (if not more) to offer as other parts of Australia. It’s compact and easy to get around, so even if you only have a week to explore the island, there is still time to visit more than just the well-known sights of Hobart, Port Arthur, Launceston, Cradle Mountain, and Wineglass Bay. Here are a few off the beaten track spots worth visiting on your trip to Tasmania

Walls of Jerusalem

Cradle Mountain National Park gets all the glory, but the Walls of Jerusalem National Park, located to the East is arguably a more spectacular and significantly less touristy destination for wilderness lovers in Tasmania. It’s not accessible by road and the 4 hours trek required to get to the heart of the park is a big enough barrier to deter the casual tourist crowd.

On the path inside the heart of the Walls of Jerusalem National Park

On the path in the heart of the Walls of Jerusalem National Park

You won’t see busloads of tourists snapping photos with ipads inside the Walls. In fact, it is possible that you won’t come across many other hikers at all. But you will come face to face with some of Tasmania’s most jarring scenery, harsh weather conditions, and challenging hikes. And if you push through and persevere you will be rewarded by remarkable views of the jagged mountain peaks, fragile pencil pine forests, pristine lakes and tarns, and unique alpine vegetation.

With 7 peaks, numerous walks, lakes, and viewpoints, the exploration possibilities within the Walls of Jerusalem park are almost limitless.

Overlooking the pine forest in Walls of Jerusalem National Park.

Overlooking the pine forest in Walls of Jerusalem National Park.

Views from the plateau at Solomon's Throne. Walls of Jerusalem National Park

Views from the plateau at Solomon’s Throne

Solomon's Throne. Walls of Jerusalem National Park

Solomon’s Throne. Walls of Jerusalem National Park

The Walls of Jerusalem National Park earned the title of our favourite destination in Tasmania and is one we highly recommend to all nature and adventure lovers! If you can spare the time, plan to spend 2- 3 days exploring the walls, giving yourself enough days to hike  both the Solomon’s Throne and Mt Jerusalem from Wild Dog Creek campsite.

Corinna

Somewhere on the edge of the Tarkine, the largest cool temperate rainforest in Australia, and on the banks of the majestic Pieman River, sits a remote historic mining town of Corinna. Over the years, Corinna has become an eco-tourism retreat with a remote off the grid settlement with two streets and one restaurant/bar/shop. Travelers come to Corinna to get away from civilization, disconnect from technology and reconnect with nature.

Whyte River, Corinna, Tasmania

Whyte River, Corinna, Tasmania

It’s a peaceful and quiet town that offers a number of unique experiences in the wild. We loved spending an early morning kayaking on the Pieman River and wished we had stayed longer to check out some of Corinna’s great wilderness walks, river cruises, and fishing trips. Stay in Corinna’s eco-cabins, pitch a tent in one of the allocated camping spots, or travel there with Tasmanian Safaris and stay in more luxurious permanent tents in a secluded spot just a minute away from the restaurant.

Your kayak awaits. Pierman River.

Your kayak awaits. Pieman River.

Converted historic miners cabins. Perfect for your stay in Corinna

Converted historic miners cabins. Perfect for your stay in Corinna

Permanent luxury tents available to Tasmanian Safari customers, Corinna

Permanent luxury tents available to Tasmanian Safari customers, Corinna

Tarkine Hotel and Bar, Corinna

Tarkine Hotel and Bar, Corinna

Veranda outside of the Tarkine Hotel, in Corinna.

Veranda outside of the Tarkine Hotel, in Corinna.

Mt Field National Park

Loved by the locals, but often forgotten by travelers, Mt Field National Park is located just 64 km northwest of Hobart. It is a national park that offers incredible plant diversity, gushing waterfalls, great walks, and a variety of Australia’s wildlife. You are bound to be taken aback by the enchanting trails inside the park, and the impressive ferns and giant moss covered trees scattered along the trails. It’s cool, fresh and eerie inside the park, especially if you visit at the end of the day, when the crowds die down and the park’s nocturnal animals come out to play.

Mt Field National Park, Tasmania.

The fern tree path in Mt Field National Park

A peaceful giant - impressive massive tree in Mt Field National Park

A peaceful giant – impressive massive tree in Mt Field National Park

Local resident , a Tasmanian Pademelon is smaller with a more solid and rounded rump than the Benett's wallaby. Mt Field National Park

Local resident – a Tasmanian Pademelon is smaller with a more solid and rounded rump than the Benett’s wallaby.  Spotted inside the Mt Field National Park

It is one of the oldest national parks in Tasmania and is a gem that’s definitely worth exploring. Take the time to check out Russell Falls, Horseshoe Falls and Lady Barron Falls, then if time permits, head over to the other side of the park at Lake Dobson for some long day walks in the summer or skiing in the winter.

Russell Falls, Mt Field National Park, Tasmania

Russell Falls, Mt Field National Park, Tasmania

Horseshoe Falls, Mt Fields National Park, Tasmania.

Horseshoe Falls, Mt Fields National Park, Tasmania

Hazards Beach

Hazards Beach has got to be the most beautiful beach I had come across in Tasmania, yet many visitors and locals have never even stepped foot on this beautiful stretch of sand. And it’s no surprise.

Hazards Beach, Freycinet National Park

Hazards Beach, Freycinet National Park

The beach is only accessible by boat or via a 3 hour trek from the renowned Wineglass Bay in Freycinet National Park. The majority of visitors stop to admire the bay, snap a few shots and turn around. It seems that only the adventurous few take the time to explore the lesser known but more impressive Hazards Beach. If you have the time to spare, the hike to Hazards Beach is well worth it. The trail itself is pretty flat and easy to hike, making it suitable for travelers of all fitness levels. And the views at the end are well worth it!

Hazards Beach, Freycinet National Park. Tasmania

Hazards Beach, Freycinet National Park

Hazards Beach, Freycinet National Park. Tasmania

Hazards Beach, Freycinet National Park

Remarkable Cave

I was sceptical about visiting a cave with such an audacious name. How remarkable could it really be? The cave is located on the southern tip of Tasmania, just 5 kms south of Port Arthur and promises to impress visitors with its unique rock formations and beautiful waterways. I wasn’t too hopeful.

To reach the cave one must descend 100 odd steps to the viewing platform below. From there, you can view right through the cave. It’s a nice view, but nothing compared with the view you can get by jumping off the viewing platform and venturing inside the cave.

View of the Remarkable Cave from the viewing platform. Port Arthur

View of the Remarkable Cave from the viewing platform

The waves crash into the Remarkable Cave

The waves crash into the Remarkable Cave

The Remarkable Cave from the inside

The Remarkable Cave from the inside

We were lucky to visit the cave at low tide and be able to walk into the cave and out the other side without getting wet. And that’s when the views got really spectacular. The golden light of nearing dawn illuminated the cave while the waves gently glided onto the sand just outside.

Great views just outside the Remarkable Cave. Port Arthur. Tasmania

Great views just outside the Remarkable Cave. Port Arthur. Tasmania

It really was … remarkable and definitely worth the 30 minute detour from Port Arthur.

Binalong Bay

Binalong Bay is situated at the southern end of the beautiful Bay of Fires, an area known for its white beaches, turquoise waters, and striking orange granite rocks. The stretch is vibrant, rich with natural beauty, and impressive enough to earn the covet title of Lonely Planet’s “World’s Hottest Travel Destination”.

Binalong Bay

Binalong Bay

Yet despite the fame, the spot is still largely popular with the locals, who come here to camp, hang out on the beach, boat, fish, bird watch, and swim. The town of Binalong Bay offers the most spectacular views of the Bay of Fires with the whitest finest sand and lots of shacks, beach houses, places to eat, drink, and shop. It makes for a perfect destination for a 2-3 day stop on a road trip along the Tasmania’s east coast.

Lichen, composite organism that emerges from algae or cyanobacteria, gives the rocks in the Bay of Fires their orange colour.

Lichen, composite organism that emerges from algae or cyanobacteria, gives the rocks in the Bay of Fires their orange colour.

While it is easy to explore these 6 hidden gems in Tasmania on your own, we would have never come across them if it wasn’t for our partnership with Tasmanian Safaris, a small local tour operator offering a selection of camping, hiking, canoeing, and wildlife spotting tours. We followed their 5 day Out West TASafari itinerary, experiencing their safari tents in Corinna and checking out their recommended activities along the way.

Huge thanks to Aran from Tasmanian Safaris for hosting us on this part of the trip and showing us some of his favourite off the beaten track spots in Tasmania!

Essential Travel Info:
(for those looking to explore these spots without an organized tour)

Getting there: The easiest way to get around Tasmania and to these 6 off the beaten track spots is by hiring a car and traveling around Tasmania at your own pace.

Where to stay: Some of these destinations do offer basic hotels/cabins that can be booked on Agoda, others have no facilities and require travelers to be self sustainable with tents, food and cooking equipment.

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Tasmania is a paradise for nature lovers and there is no better way to get closer to nature then by visiting these 6 great off the beaten track places!

Have you ever explored Tasmania beyond the major sights and attractions?
Do you have any other off the beaten track spots to add to the list?